Green Beret’s No-Nonsense Bug Out

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is an important study in human motivation. I find myself referring to this hierarchy on a continual basis when it comes to survival and preparedness. I feel it correlates rather well. It is often represented as a pyramid with the most basic needs being the base of that pyramid. The implication being that the base needs to be satisfied before the next higher level can be pursued. Not surprisingly, the basic needs are Physiological needs: food, water, warmth, and rest.

If you have followed me for any amount of time, you may notice the similarities in how I teach the Survival Priorities: First Aid for Life Threats, Core Temperature Control (fire, clothing, and shelter), Hydration, Calorie Consumption, and Rest. I tend to call them “Metabolic Needs”, but they are indeed “physiological”. Providing for these needs is what keeps you alive at the most basic level, which is the goal of survival: to stay alive, often despite difficult circumstances.

The hierarchy takes this a step further. The second level adds safety and security to the list of basic needs, and I don’t disagree. From a survival standpoint, often those situations are due to becoming lost or injured, and the real danger is in not being prepared to provide for those basic needs. Not being able to handle a life-threatening injury, being exposed to the elements without the ability to regulate your temperature, and dehydration are far more likely than something like an apex predator taking you out. Being able to provide for those needs may be all that is necessary to provide a reasonable level of safety and security. From a “prepper’s” perspective, however, the situation may require more drastic measures for ensuring the safety and security of yourself and your family.

And what could possibly be more important than being able to provide for the physiological needs, safety, and security of yourself and your family in an emergency or disaster? For me, the answer is nothing. I will even go as far as to do without and give up my own safety and security to provide for my family. I am sure most of you would as well. Being a provider and being as leader for your family requires sacrifice. If you are reading this, you have likely already settled in on that role.

So how do you prepare your family? It is a simple equation with a more complicated solution and execution. First and foremost, you must Plan and Prepare. Second, you must Train and Rehearse. Lastly, you have to be prepared to Execute at any time. Sounds simple, right? But where do you start?

I cannot promise you that I have all the answers for your situation, skill level, and environment. What I can do is teach you my (and unique) system of preparedness that I use for myself and my family. That will, at a minimum, serve as a system that you can adopt or adapt to meet your specific needs and environment. In addition, it will show you what areas and skills that you may need to improve on for your overall preparedness. This is all part of that “Plan and Prepare” portion of the equation. With that said, it is up to you to adapt it to meet your specific needs. It is also up to you to do an honest assessment of your skill level and ability to use all the resources I recommend.

Can you make a fire and shelter, procure water, and make it safe to drink, navigate cross country, and provide lifesaving first aid? Can you secure all your resources and protect yourself and your family? If you are weak in any of those areas, seek out training to strengthen those skills. I have recently put together an incredible team to provide the best possible training in multiple locations that you will be able to take advantage of in the coming months. That is the “Train and Rehearse” portion of the equation.

As far as the Execution, that depends on the state of the world we live in and we have no control over how or when it happens. All we can control is how we react to it.

My new film “Green Beret’s No-Nonsense Bug Out” is the first in a series of films that are meant to pass my personal system on to you. This first film gives you the baseline to start preparing yourself and your family. It not only shows you what resources you need, but how to use them. In addition, you will learn more about how everything fits together in the bigger picture.

I should mention that “bugging in”, that is staying put in the comfort of your home with all your supplies, is always the best plan for as long as it is possible. It is only when that is no longer safe that you would even consider leaving that behind to “bug out”. However, you already live at home. You probably already have at least some supplies and groceries. What most people are not prepared for, is to be pushed out of that comfort zone without warning (which again, would only be if it were no longer safe to stay put). That is one of many reasons I chose to start with this film which focuses on building a plan, putting together a bag and knowing how to use it, and developing a system of caches to lighten your load. Having something as simple as a PACE plan and a Bug Out Bag ready to go already puts you head and shoulders above the preparedness level of most people, so that is where it starts. Future films in this series will focus on preparing your home, your vehicle, and alternate “bug in” locations.

Here is what is covered in this first film:

  • Definitions of Survival, Bushcraft, and Preparedness and how I feel they all work together for the common goal: keeping yourself and your family alive in a disaster.
  • Survival Priorities in the context of Preparedness
  • Developing PACE Plans to plan and prepare for contingencies
  • When you should “Bug In” vs. “Bug Out”
  • Baseline Bug Out Bag Packing List to serve as a starting point for all environments
  • Supplemental Kits that are added to the Baseline Kit to provide for more unique situations and environments (Urban, Cold Weather, Medical, Camouflage and Concealment, Tactical)
  • Developing a system of caches to lighten your load. What to pack and how to emplace them
  • Navigation tips to help you navigate cross country quickly
  • Finding Natural and Opportunistic Shelters to save time, and how to tie basic knots and establish basic poncho shelters when needed
  • Properly constructing and using a Dakota Fire Pit to help reduce the risk of being seen
  • Finding water resources and making them safe to drink
  • Firearms and calibers that I choose for my own security and that of my family

This film is meant for everyone, whether you are just getting started or have been preparing for a while. My system is unique and not likely to bear much resemblance to what the established norms are in the preparedness industry. I think that you will find real value in this system and I think it will help meet your needs. You can buy my new film HERE.

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About Joshua Enyart

Joshua Enyart is a former Army Ranger and Green Beret specializing in emergency and tactical survival, bushcraft, and preparedness, primarily in the Woodlands and Mountains of the Eastern United States.

Joshua Enyart is the Founder and Lead Instructor for Flint & Steel Critical Skills Group, LLC and is an Instructor for the Pathfinder School, LLC, and is an Instructor for Prepper Advantage.  Joshua has also been a contributor to both ReadyMan and the American Protection Alliance, and has been a speaker at the Prepper World Summit.

He has completed several military schools including Ranger, SERE Level-C (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape), Special Forces Qualification Course (Weapons), Special Forces Sniper Course, and trained as a Combat Hunter (Tracker).

Joshua completed a total of 11 Combat Tours in Iraq and in Afghanistan (as both Active Duty and as a Private Contractor) where he was awarded several medals including the Bronze Star. He has also been to the Jungle Operations Training Center in Panama (Central America) three times.

Joshua is a seasoned instructor that has completed both the Army Instructor Training Course and the Air Force Basic Instructor Course. He served as a senior Pre-Ranger Instructor for the 101st Airborne Division, Weapons and Tactics Instructor for the Air Force Special Operations Command, and a Sniper Trainer and Ground Warfare Instructor for the Marine Special Operations Command.

He is also an Emergency Medical Technician and a Junior in college majoring in Biology, working towards Physician’s Assistant School.

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